Original Research

Failure to detect equid herpesvirus types 1 and 4 DNA in placentae and healthy new-born Thoroughbred foals

Lara J. Brown, Geoff Brown, Julia Kydd, Tom A.E. Stout, Martin L. Schulman
Journal of the South African Veterinary Association | Vol 90 | a1736 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/jsava.v90i0.1736 | © 2019 Lara J. Brown, Geoff Brown, Julia Kydd, Tom A.E. Stout, Martin L. Schulman | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 16 September 2018 | Published: 30 May 2019

About the author(s)

Lara J. Brown, Department of Production Animal Studies, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa
Geoff Brown, Section of Reproduction, Department of Production Animal Studies, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa
Julia Kydd, School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, University of Nottingham, Leicestershire, United Kingdom
Tom A.E. Stout, Department of Production Animal Studies, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa; and, Department of Equine Sciences, Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands
Martin L. Schulman, Department of Production Animal Studies, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa


Share this article

Bookmark and Share

Abstract

Equid herpesvirus type 1 is primarily a respiratory tract virus associated with poor athletic performance that can also cause late gestation abortion, neonatal foal death and encephalomyelopathy. Horizontal transmission is well described, whereas evidence of vertical transmission of equid herpesvirus type 1 associated with the birth of a healthy foal has not been demonstrated. This study sampled a population of Thoroughbred mares (n = 71), and their healthy neonatal foals and foetal membranes, to test for the presence of both equid herpesvirus types 1 and 4 using a quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay. Foetal membrane swabs and tissue samples were taken immediately post-partum, and venous blood samples and nasal swabs were obtained from both mare and foal 8 h after birth. Neither equid herpesvirus type 1 nor equid herpesvirus type 4 nucleic acid was detected in any sample, and it was concluded that there was no active shedding of equid herpesvirus types 1 and 4 at the time of sampling. Consequently, no evidence of vertical transmission of these viruses could be found on this stud farm during the sampling period.

Keywords

equines; equid herpesvirus type 1 and 4; placentae; foetal membranes; foals; qPCR; latency; Thoroughbred

Metrics

Total abstract views: 207
Total article views: 104


Crossref Citations

No related citations found.