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Effects of the number of people on efficient capture and sample collection: A lion case study

Sam M. Ferreira, Nkabeng T. Maruping, Darius Schoultz, Travis R. Smit
Journal of the South African Veterinary Association | Vol 84, No 1 | a131 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/jsava.v84i1.131 | © 2013 Sam M. Ferreira, Nkabeng T. Maruping, Darius Schoultz, Travis R. Smit | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 14 May 2012 | Published: 24 May 2013

About the author(s)

Sam M. Ferreira, SANParks Scientific Services, Skukuza, South Africa
Nkabeng T. Maruping, Department of Nature Conservation, Tshwane University of Technology, South Africa
Darius Schoultz, Ajubatus Foundation, Hoedspruit Wildlife Estate, South Africa
Travis R. Smit, Ajubatus Foundation, Hoedspruit Wildlife Estate, South Africa


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Abstract

Certain carnivore research projects and approaches depend on successful capture of individuals of interest. The number of people present at a capture site may determine success of a capture. In this study 36 lion capture cases in the Kruger National Park were used to evaluate whether the number of people present at a capture site influenced lion response rates and whether the number of people at a sampling site influenced the time it took to process the collected samples. The analyses suggest that when nine or fewer people were present, lions appeared faster at a call-up locality compared with when there were more than nine people. The number of people, however, did not influence the time it took to process the lions. It is proposed that efficient lion capturing should spatially separate capture and processing sites and minimise the number of people at a capture site.


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Crossref Citations

1. State-shifts of lion prey selection in the Kruger National Park
N. T. Maruping-Mzileni, P. J. Funston, S. M. Ferreira
Wildlife Research  vol: 44  issue: 1  first page: 28  year: 2017  
doi: 10.1071/WR16090