Original Research

Ixodid ticks on cattle belonging to small-scale farmers at 4 communal grazing areas in South Africa

N.R. Bryson, G.A. Tice, I.G. Horak, C.G. Stewart, B.J.A. Du Plessis
Journal of the South African Veterinary Association | Vol 73, No 3 | a568 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/jsava.v73i3.568 | © 2002 N.R. Bryson, G.A. Tice, I.G. Horak, C.G. Stewart, B.J.A. Du Plessis | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 06 July 2002 | Published: 06 July 2002

About the author(s)

N.R. Bryson,
G.A. Tice,
I.G. Horak,
C.G. Stewart,
B.J.A. Du Plessis,

Full Text:

PDF (164KB)

Share this article

Bookmark and Share

Abstract

Ixodid ticks were collected during the period September 1991 to August 1993 from cattle belonging to small-scale farmers utilising 4 communal grazing areas. Three of these were in North West Province and 1 in Mpumalanga province, South Africa. Ten tick species were collected in North West Province and 7 in Mpumalanga. The adults of Amblyomma hebraeum, Rhipicephalus appendiculatus and Rhipicephalus evertsi evertsi were most numerous in North West Province, while in Mpumalanga Boophilus decoloratus comprised more than 75% of the total population. Amblyomma hebraeum was present on all grazing areas, and heavy infestations of adults occurred during the period October to May on 1 of these. Few B. decoloratus were collected in North West Province, chiefly because the sampling method was inadequate, and most of these were present during early summer (October to December) and late summer and autumn (March to May). The initially low population of B. decoloratus in Mpumalanga increased substantially towards the conclusion of the survey, probably because of the cessation of dipping. Boophilus microplus was present in small numbers on 2 grazing areas in the North West Province. Adult Hyalomma marginatum rufipes reached peak numbers from December to February and Hyalomma truncatum from February to April in the North West Province. Only H. marginatum rufipes was collected in Mpumalanga. Rhipicephalus appendiculatus was present on all the grazing areas, with most adults present from December to April. Most adult Rhipicephalus evertsi evertsi were collected from September to April and Rhipicephalus simus was present during the period October-April.

Keywords

Cattle; Communal Grazing Areas; Ixodid Ticks; Mpumalanga Province; North West Province; Seasonal Occurrence; Small-Scale Farmers; South Africa

Metrics

Total abstract views: 1403
Total article views: 2262


Crossref Citations

No related citations found.